To view this site please upgrade or use another browser. Try either Chrome, Safari, FireFox, Opera or Microsoft Edge.

Post-master courses

The Royal Institute of Art’s post-master courses in architecture and Fine Arts are aimed at professional artists and architects. These courses are at an advanced level and contain of a large component of research methodology. They are experimental, provide room for risk-taking, and utilize learning processes wherein the group dynamic is focal. The courses are designed for those who are interested in current issues in art and architecture in relation to political, historical and social themes.

Decolonizing Architecture: Experimental Sites of Knowledge Production (continuation course)

This course reflects on how architecture and other spatial sciences arise in physical spaces and bodies, as well as in groups and through experiences.

The aim of this advanced course is to develop a research environment that promotes diversity, sustainability and equality. We also encourage and develop research practices that arise within the course. During the continuation course, participants will have the opportunity to deepen and develop the collaboration with institutions and actors encountered during the previous year.

Practical information

Second cycle, 30 credits, 50%
Language: English
Course coordinator: Alessandro Petti and Marie-Louise Richards
Starts: September 1, 2020
Ends: June 6, 2021

Eligibility Requirements

This continuation course is only available to participants who have completed the previous year’s course.

Selection

Results from the previous year as well as letters of motivation which clearly indicate how the applicant intends to develop projects, individually or in groups, from the previous year’s course.

Registration

The last registration date was May 5, 2020.

Decolonizing Architecture: Modernism and Demodernization

In European cities, an increase of populations with a migrant background has meant that the struggle for decolonization, which was once mainly located outside Europe, has today moved within its borders. Historical processes of colonization and decolonization, as well as today’s conditions of coloniality and decoloniality, have shaped the world order. In this global scenario, architecture has always played a crucial role in organizing both spatial relations and those of ideology and hierarchy.

Architectural modernism continues to be lauded for its progressive social and political agenda. At the same time, the modernist rhetoric of innovation hides a dark side, with built-in dimensions of homogenization, authoritarianism and segregation. These modernist concepts are still present in contemporary architecture and urban planning, where in the name of modern architecture entire communities, historical sites and ways of life are erased.

Decolonizing Architecture is part of a course- and research-series that forms the platform: Decolonizing Architecture Advanced Studies (DAAS) for higher education at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm. Each year the course focuses on a specific theme.

2nd year continuation course

A supplementary course gives students the opportunity to further develop the research project that grows during the first year. The Decolonizing Architecture Continuation Course allows students to join a collective international group interested in the social and political dimension of architecture. It also gives the participants access to necessary materials and learning processes to develop their own practice in art and architecture.

Practical information

Second cycle, 60 credits, 100%
Language: English
Course coordinator: Alessandro Petti and Marie-Louise Richards
Starts: September 1, 2020
Ends: June 6, 2021

Eligibility Requirements

Master’s degree in art, architecture or related field
or
Prior learning gained through other relevant education and professional experience.

Selection

Previous projects and experience, as well as a letter of motivation. The letter should clearly state why the course and its conceptual framework are relevant to the applicant.

Registration

The last registration date was May 5, 2020.

Materialities – Coordinates: Translating Form

This course is a one-year extension of the post-master course Materialities. Here, participants deepen and explore the transition between materiality and immateriality through digital and analogue technologies.

The intuitive, immediate idea we have of what spatiality is depends on a certain notion of immateriality: the gaping void through which objects and bodies appear, but which appears in our imagination as neither object nor body. In that sense, it is like virtual reality. 

The idea of the physical room as a flowing background against which various disruptions take the form of figures (a river, a hill, a distinct tree…) may well have been the first cultural distinction made between figure and background in relation to the relationship between subject and object. How something is mapped becomes crucial to how we represent our relationship to the world, through a series of related coordinates with relative positions, which are scalable and therefore separate from our immediate perception of them. 

All technology related to 3D-scanning and -printing, motion capture-related effects, and VR-generating software – as well as the creation of sound landscapes and projection-mapping – rely on this basic principle concerning how points are interconnected in an abstract space and can be scaled, in everything from the graphic representation of an idea to the construction of an immersive environment. 

This course is intended primarily for students who have passed the Materialities course, or those who can otherwise demonstrate an equivalent knowledge with regards to the course and its scope. This includes basic programming of photogrammetry, 3D scanning and printing, multichannel audio, Unity, Isadora projection-mapping and an understanding of the principles of how mechatronics, AR, and VR can be used. 

Practical information

Second cycle, 60 credits, 100%
Language: English
Course coordinator: Åsa Andersson Broms
Starts: September 1, 2020
Ends: June 6, 2021

Eligibility Requirements

60 credits from the course Materialities – Coordinates: Translating Form or from a previous course in Materialities, or comparable qualifications
or
Prior learning gained through other relevant education and professional experience.

Selection

Letter of motivation, CV, and portfolio of work samples, or other documentation that demonstrates the knowledge required. A total of five work samples must be submitted.

Registration

The last registration date was May 5, 2020.

Of Public Interest

What we call “public space”—and the activities that occur within it—are increasingly surveilled, politicized, and privatized. What does this mean when public spaces have throughout history served as important sites in shaping how, when, and where people relate to each other within a society? What role does art have within these spaces?

For a long time art in public space has had a reputation of being large scale, mostly decorative objects placed outdoors. Yet if we recognize and explore the changes that are occurring in public space, and marry that with emphasizing the knowledge, methods, and values that art and related practices create, then we enter into a far more interesting, and consequential arena for both art and public space.

As artist Sharon Hayes has said, “Anything that happens in Public Space actually happens.”

The course will focus on artistic values and practice-based thinking/making as a means to explore the significant role art can have within the realm of public space. To take a seat at this table is a complex task when faced with various regulations, public policies, profit-driven interests, as well as differing goals, attitudes and aesthetics. Participants will consider, discuss and work on actual projects in order to gain knowledge from experience in dealing with the complexities of making work for and in the public.

Practical information

Second cycle, 60 credits, 100%
Language: English
Course coordinator: Jonas Dahlberg
Starts: September 1, 2020
Ends: June 6, 2021

Eligibility Requirements

Master’s degree in art, architecture or other related field
or
Prior learning gained through other relevant education and professional experience.

Selection

Letter of motivation, CV and portfolio with work samples. We particularly welcome applicants with strong artistic integrity, critical thinking skills, and an interest in developing projects in a multidisciplinary environment with peer-to-peer pedagogy.

Registration

The last registration date was May 5, 2020.

Collective Practices Research Program

Cecilia Vicuña, El Paro / The Strike, 2018, after the lost original 1977. Oil on linen. 54 x 63.5 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.
Cecilia Vicuña, El Paro / The Strike, 2018, after the lost original 1977. Oil on linen. 54 x 63.5 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

Collective practices exist in all societies and have a rich but complex heritage in art, politics and the sciences. How does the current ecological and technological climate affect how we live, work, and think collectively? Which collective practices promote change, and a better understanding of social issues?

This program draws on current research, publications and projects that involve collective methods in the arts, sciences and society. In a transdisciplinary seminar, we gather specialists to address current controversies and experimentations in various fields. This repertoire includes attitudes, activities, tools and infrastructures that have been developed by individuals and organizations to reflect critically on the ownership, governance and division of disciplines, and to bring about a more inclusive and sustainable society.

The program serves as an practice-based research-collective, organized around principles of mutual learning. It consists of a gathering of joint practices which include group-readings, seminars and workshops, tutorials, lectures and field trips.

Collective Practices Research Program is led by Grégory Castéra, curator and co-director of Council (Paris) in collaboration with a faculty of artists and art collectives, curators, academics, and practitioners from other fields. Collective Practices Research Program is a Post-master by the Royal Institute of Art developed in collaboration with Council.

Practical information

Second cycle, 60 credits, 100%
Language: English
Course coordinator: Grégory Castéra
Starts: September 1, 2020
Ends: June 6, 2021

Eligibility Requirements

Master’s degree in art, architecture or humanities or other related field
or
Prior learning gained through other relevant education and professional experience.

Selection

Letter of motivation, CV, portfolio of work samples, and interview. The letter should clearly state why the course is relevant to the applicant’s studies. The work samples should be related to the course’s theme. This course is intended for those who engage in the social, political and ecological dimensions of collective practice (anthropology, education, philosophy, linguistics, law, cultural studies, political science, history, activism, agriculture, engineering).

Registration

The last registration date was May 5, 2020.

Architectural Conservation: We create the future, it shapes us

Architectural conservation provides a number of relevant methods and approaches toward the area of architectural cultural heritage. Here we explore how architectural conservation’s wealth of knowledge, tools, and methods of analysis contribute to building a society using new approaches and insights that more fully integrate humanistic and idealist principles.

Building a society with reduced climate impact is one of the greatest challenges of our time. We try to understand the complexity of the problem with new tools and approaches. Through intangible and material values, culture and heritage produce associations and tell stories about who we are, where we come from, and how we live.

Architectural conservation’s long-term perspective and focus on preserving, cultivating and usability provide knowledge about how we influence the future with our building traditions. We analyze architectural conservation the structure of society from different perspectives.

Practical information

Second cycle, 60 credits, 100%
Language: Swedish
Course coordinator: Cecilia Sagrén
Starts: September 1, 2020
Ends: June 6, 2021

Eligibility Requirements

Master’s degree in architecture or related field, and relevant professional experience
or
Prior learning gained through other relevant education and professional experience.

Selection

Letter of motivation, CV, portfolio with work samples, and potential interview.

Registration

The last registration date was May 5, 2020.